Make a blog

questionableallcdiary

5 days ago

Gardening: Give yourself a living Christmas present - Florida Times-Union

The holidays seem to come earlier every year and stores are loaded with Christmas options for decorating. Festive plants are easy additions to jazz up a room or the front entrance.

Although there are many plants that remind us of the holidays, poinsettias are still the No. 1 Christmas plant. Red poinsettias are by far the biggest seller, but some of the new colors are catching on. Colors include white, pinks, mauve, peach, orange and many combination colors so they can go with any color theme. Size varies as well; short, medium or tall plants are available and can easily be matched to the location.

When selecting a poinsettia, look for one that has healthy green leaves up and d

2 months ago

Dan Gill's gardening tips: battle summer weeds, pick out the grubs - NOLA.com

This week's gardening tips: "Fall is for Planting" is the theme of the Folsom Fall Garden Festival on Saturday (Sept. 24) from 8:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at the Midway Church Park next to 82424 Highway 25 in Folsom. Admission is free. Sponsored by the Southeast Louisiana Nursery Association, the event offers a rare chance for gardeners to chat with the growers who produce much of the nursery stock offered at local retail nurseries. The festival will feature plant sales, children's activities, concessions and displays of gardening equipment and accessories.

When turning the soil to plant flowers or vegetable crops, you may encounter white, C-shaped beetle larva called grubs. They're very common and feed on the roots of plants, mostly trees. Populations typically are not high and picking them out is all the control you need.

Over the next couple of months, do not be concerned about the declining health of deciduous tree and shrub foliage. (Deciduous trees and shrubs are those that drop their leaves in winter). You will begin to see various leaf spots, scorched edges, yellow leaves and other symptoms. These trees and shrubs are getting ready to shed their leaves, and the spots and blemishes are just part of the process.

Flower plumes or seed heads of ornamental grasses can be used in arrangements. Spray with a little clear shellac or hair spray to keep them from shattering. Pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana) is producing especially showy flower plumes now.

Known as spider lilies, hurricane lilies or naked ladies, Lycoris radiata blooms with clusters of red flowers arising on bare stems from the ground this month (Sept.). When the flowers stalks of this traditional Southern bulb have faded, trim the stems to the ground. Watch for the narrow, dark green, silver-striped foliage to appear, and be sure not to cut it back during its growing season this winter and spring.

Many summer weeds are setting seeds now. Do not let this happen. Pull these weeds to reduce weed problems next year. In particular, stay on top of gripe weed or chamberbitters. This weed looks like a little mimosa tree and sets copious amounts of seeds. Pull them up promptly wherever you see them, and make sure the mulch is about 2 inches thick to prevent them from growing back.

Plant petunias now for blooms this fall and next spring. Petunias, snapdragons, nicotiana, calendula and dianthus are among the more heat-tolerant cool-season bedding plants and can be planted earlier than more heat-sensitive plants, such as pansies.

Look for ornamental peppers in area nurseries now. They come in an amazing array of foliage and fruit colors and provide long lasting color. Plants display multi-colored fruit of cream, yellow, orange, lavender, purple and red depending on the variety. They combine beautifully with chrysanthemums and ornamental pumpkins and gourds. Also try marigolds planted in pots or beds now for a long, autumn bloom season in yellow, gold, orange and mahogany.

Enter the Jazzin' Up the Neighborhood Garden Contest, sponsored by NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune, the LSU AgCenter and the Metro Area Horticulture Foundation. For details, click see below.

Dan Gill is a horticulturist with the LSU AgCenter.

5 months ago

No interest loans available to help with home repairs - DeWitt Media

Have you been putting off home repairs?

There are funds available to help homeowners who would like to make repairs to their homes. The Home Repair Program offers loans at no interest to income eligible homeowners for necessary repairs. You repay the loan when you no longer occupy the home (when you sell or move out of the home). Loans can be provided for properties located in Barron, Buffalo, Clark, Chippewa, Dunn, Eau Claire, Pepin, Pierce, Polk and St. Croix Counties.

There is no interest on the loan and there are no monthly payments required. The owner/estate pays back only what they borrowed, no interest when they no longer occupy the loan.

The loans are available for necessary home repairs such as replacing siding, windows, doors, furnaces water/sewer laterals from the curb to the house, replacing septic systems and wells, upgrading plumbing, heating and electric systems, installing insulation, repairing foundations, and making a home accessible for a member who has a disability. Funds cannot be used for general remodeling such as updating decor. Loans must be approved prior to the work being started. Funds cannot be used to reimburse a family for work already completed. Repairs to mobile homes are eligible if the owner also owns the land beneath the mobile home. Mobile homes in mobile home parks are not eligible.

Owners choose the contractor they will use. Participants are required to get 3 bids from contractors of their choice. Contractors must carry liability insurance and provide the Program Administrator with income tax identification information.

To apply for the program or obtain more information you can contact:

Valerie Prueher (Barron, Dunn, Pierce, Polk, St. Croix counties): 715-726-4580

Lori Artz (Chippewa, Clark counties): 715-738-2596

Georgia Crownhart (Buffalo, Eau Claire, Pepin counties): 715-839-2889

House-

hold

size

Barron, Buffalo,ClarkChippewa, Eau ClaireDunnPepinPolkPierce,St. Croix1$33,750$38,550$35,700$33,800$33,850$46,0002$38,550$44,050$40,800$38,600$38,650$52,6003$43,350$49,550$45,900$43,450$43,500$59,1504$48,150$55,050$50,950$48,250$48,250$65,7005$52,050$59,500$55,050$52,150$52,200$71,0006$55,900$63,900$59,150$56,000$56,050$76,2507$59,750$68,300$63,200$59,850$59,900$81,5008$63,600$72,700$67,300$63,700$63,800$86,750 Both comments and pings are currently closed.

http://news.google.com/news/url?sa=t&fd=R&ct2=us&usg=AFQjCNHZbTUOnP7V6KBKmYf4V7OzfdjXcQ&clid=c3a7d30bb8a4878e06b80cf16b898331&ei=sphzV8iyEeOYuAKq7rq4BA&url=http://www.dewittmedia.com/no-interest-loans-available-to-help-with-home-repairs-4/

8 months ago

How Gardening Could Save You $600 on Groceries - Money Magazine

107981379Francesco RuggeriGetty ImagesUnlike many hobbies, gardening gives you a practical return on your investment.

While you may know musician Jack Johnson for his mellow hits like Better Together, Upside Down or Banana Pancakes, hes likely less known for his home-grown Swiss chard, eggplants